New Wearable Dog Technology? Why yes! Exclusive Launch event May 30-31st in NYC at Zoomies

Big News everyone! We are proud and happy to be hosting our NYC launch event on May 30-31 in NYC at the iconic and legendary Zoomies.

If you are in the area we would love to meet you, and if you are not then be sure to tell your friends and family!

We also have a brand new website, and would love it if you took a look!

Hachiko zoomies email campaign 2

Moving With Your Dog

Moving . With your dog

Moving. That word can send a shiver up our spine like no other. Packing everything into boxes, hauling it across town (or even worse across country). It’s exhausting just thinking about it. But you also know the silver lining. The new house, new town- and in the end it’s worth it.

You dog, however, has no idea what’s going on.

So as you are planning your move and trying to make sure everything goes as smoothly as possible, don’t forget to make sure to take extra precautions to make the move as simple as possible for your pet.

  • Before the move – Build a checklist of things to take care of- be sure to include:
    • A visit to the vet- If you are moving far and you are leaving your vet go in for one last visit. Use this time to:
      • Get refills on all medications
      • Get any vaccines you need
      • If you are traveling long distance it may be worth getting a sedative
      • Ask for a copy of your dog’s medical history and vaccination records
      • Also always worth checking with them if they have a recommendation for a vet in your new area
    • Visit your groomer- here again if you are moving far then it’s worth a last to your favorite groomer. This is especially useful if you are going to travel by car because clipping those nails and a little trim can help keep your car looking spiffy.
    • Build a travel plan- You may just be moving a few streets down, but if you are moving farther away make sure to think out your travel plans
      • If you are flying to your new home double check the airline requirements- you may need a health certificate or an updated vaccine record
      • If you are driving to your new home be sure to plan the trip in advance:
        • Look at dog friendly hotels, restaurants and plan plenty of pit stops
      • Update your dog’s microchip- We The night before you leave update your dog’s microchip information with your new address
      • If you are moving close it’s worth to take your dog there ahead of time to start exploring the area
  • Packing:
    • Order your packing supplies (boxes, tape, etc.) and have them arrive a few days in advance so your pooch can get used to them
    • Involve them in the process. Let them sniff the boxes and poke about so they are not surprised when everything is packed away
    • Be reassuring and give a little more attention than usual (extra treats and snuggles)
    • But also try to maintain your normal routine- normal walks, feeding schedule and no special treatment like sleeping in your bed!
    • Pack your pooches belongings (bed, toys, etc.) last

More after the jump…

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The Perfect Winter Wardrobe

We admit it. We love to dress our pets. And while there is no doubt this is a fashion statement, it can also be necessary. In the winter we feel our pooches need some extra care and protection. So we have put together our wish list items for Winter 2015.

  • No winter outfit is complete without a pair (or 4) of boots. We are loving the waterproof boots from Ruff WearThis collar from
  • Beast + Babe adds a pop of color to combat winter blues
  • We love the Camp Reversible Coat from Billy wolf is not only reversible but also water repellent (and made in Brooklyn!)
  • There is no doubt we will be the coolest dog on the block with this hat
  • And of course at the end of a long winter day we all deserve a nice bed to curl up in, and this one from Jax & Bones looks extra comfy!

We love to buy local products (and you can see from some of the designers in the list) , do you know of any others we should look out for?

A walk in the woods

 

164CED34-93BA-4D71-866B-261FAEEA65A5Yesterday we went for a picnic and came across this guy.

Black and White Sunday Blog Hop

Click here to enter your link and view this Linky Tools list…

 

 

10 Home remedies to perk up your pup

Colds, Flu’s, general winter blues got your pooch down? Before you run to the vet try these simple homemade remedies!

  1. Vitamin E- is great for your dogs skin. Apply directly to the skin by a doggie massage, or a soaking bath. If you want to give it orally talk to your vet about the proper dosage!
  2. Use citrus power to get rid of fleas- fleas hate citrus, so sprinkle your pet with a small amount of fresh squeezed orange or lemon juice
  3. Also sprinkle Borax powder on your floor when you dog has fleas and that will help by deteriorating the insects’ exoskeletons.
  4. Get rid of ticks and get a walking odor distributor- by dabbing some Rose geranium essential oil to your pooches collar
  5. Chamomile tea is great for itchy skin- make some tea let it cool and put it in a spray bottle and use as needed
  6. For a more serious itch make an oatmeal rub- mix oatmeal with water rub on to the itchy areas and leave for 10 minutes
  7. Upset tummy- give your dog some plain yogurt, the live cultures will ease it quickly
  8. For diarrhea- try mixing some pumpkin puree with your dogs food
  9. Alleviate bad breath with pupsciles- mix carrot, lime juice and fresh mint freeze and serve as a treat
  10. Does your pet get carsick? Grate ginger and mix with peanut butter as a snack before getting in the car

 

Have you used any kind of home remedies in the past? How long do you wait before turning to conventional medication?


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Separation Anxiety- How to identify and treat it

 

When speaking with dog parents a common concern seems to come up- seperation anxiety. Separation anxiety can range from a mild problem, to a severe one, to a an extreme level more akin to separation panic. But don’t worry- there are ways to help alleviate this fear.

How to identify separation anxiety

A pup chewing your rug can also come from boredom, so how can you tell when you are looking at separation anxiety? According to most experts there are a few tell tale signs:

  • As you are getting ready to leave does your dog start to get depressed
  • When you walk out the door your dog will go into a slight panic- barking, scratching the door
  • Overly joyful when you get home (to the point of hysteria)
  • Read more about signs and symptoms here

At the end of the day you know your pet best, so trust your instincts here.

What to do

There are ways to alleviate separation anxiety.

  • No big goodbyes- try to avoid contact with your pet before you leave, the goodbyes are more for you, and if you make it a big deal they will see it that way
  • No big hello’s- same as goodbyes, when you get home ignore your dog for a few minutes, don’t immediately jump and pet them
  • Get them used to it- start by leaving for 5 minutes, then 20 and then a whole day
  • Leave a something of yours behind- a shirt you slept in, or anything that smells like you
  • Feed them right before you leave and they will associate you leaving with something positive
  • Take long walks before you leave- tired them and they can spend the time away from you contently napping
  • Some people prefer to crate their pooch to give them a sense of security

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How to: choose a doggie daycare

A few posts ago we looked at how to choose the best pet sitter for your dog, and today we are looking at it from a different angle- Doggie Daycare.

Doggie daycare is a helpful tool for dog parents while traveling, but it’s also a great option for those days when you are working long hours and don’t want to leave your pup alone all day.

If your pet suffers from separation anxiety, or tends to get destructive when you are gone this option can be a life saver.

Here are things to keep in mind and questions to ask to help you find the best facility:

  1. Visit the facility- check it out, and poke around and see how the rest of the dogs seem
  2. Ask for a trial run- leaving your dog there for half a day will tell you alot about if its a good fit for him, and how he is treated
  3. How are they prepared for emergencies- anything from fires, floods to burglary should be addressed
  4. Do they ask for proof of latest vaccines?
  5. What tests does the daycare conduct to see if your dog will be accepted
  6. How do they organize dogs? Size? Play style?
  7. What is the schedule of a typical day?
  8. How do they handle bad behavior?
  9. What training has the staff gone through
  10. What is the ratio of staff to dogs
  11. What is the procedure if your pooch has a medical emergency? Do they contact your vet or do they use their own?
  12. How do they communicate/ report to you? Daily report cards?

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How to: Choose a pet sitter

One of the biggest challenges we face as dog parents is how to choose a pet sitter. Who will we entrust our four legged family member to? We all know we settle for nothing but the best. Knowing your pet is properly taken care of will give you ease of mind, and less stress when travelling.

The first question we are faced with is usually pet sitter vs. doggie day care. Today we are going to tackle pet sitters.

Pet sitters are good option for households with more than one pet, or with a dog that feels most comfortable at home. (Plus they water your plants, bonus!)

There are some sites that provide this service and some even vet their sitters (such as Pet Sitters International,Pet Sitters Network, Pet Pop, National Association of Professional Pet Sitters), but even so we always like to ask our potential pet sitters some important questions:

  1. Is the pet sitter insured and bonded?
  2. Does the pet sitter provide client references? (aim for at least 3)
  3. Will the pet sitter use a pet-sitting services agreement or contract?
  4. Is the pet sitter a Certified Professional Pet Sitter (CPPS) and/or has he or she participated in pet-care training, such as pet first aid?
  5. How do you ensure your dog does not go missing in your care?
  6. Do you have a plan in the event that your dog does go missing?
  7. Is there a backup person that can provide care for your dog?
  8. Why do you like being a pet sitter?
  9. Will you also play with my dog, or just come for walks?
  10. How many other pets are you currently sitting for?

What other questions do you ask? Tell us about your experiences or and advice you have in the comments below!

To crate or not to crate?

There comes a point, sooner or later, when every dog parent is faced with a decision: to crate or not to crate.

While most experts agree that dogs should be crate trained, since some situations require it (for example after vet procedures or plane travel), there is a definite split between those that use crating at home for training/ containment purposes or for car travel.

Crating as a training/containment tool:

Many dog owners use crates with puppies and adopted adult dogs to train them and also to make sure dogs stay out of harm’s way when they are left alone.

  • Pro’s:
    • It can keep dogs safe- and prevent them from getting into trouble by chewing power cables, or running around the house
    • The carte can be a sanctuary for you dog- a safe place for them to go that is their own
    • It’s a great training tool
  • Con’s:
    • It is very easily abused- PETA is very firm in it’s guidance that crating as a training tool can have adverse effects
    • It deprives dogs of freedom- dogs that spend most of the day in a crate are limited in their movements, and limits their interaction with the environment
    • Can lead to behavioral problems when used excessively

Crating while travelling:

While in some situations, such as plane travel, this is not a decision left to us (then we need to decide if it’s worth the crating- but we’ll get into that later) we have come across an interesting debate in terms of crating during car travel.

  • Pro’s:
    • Less distracting for the driver- having your dog jumping or sliding around, or worse sitting on your lap (which is illegal in some states) can put both you’re and your pup in an emergency situation
    • Protects the dog in an emergency stop- there are also crash tested crates, so think of this as your dog’s seatbelt
  • Con’s
    • Owner guilt associated with putting their dog in a crate- we recommend taking frequent stops (every 2-3 hours) and let your dog out for a quick sniff and jog
    • Do not leave your dog in the crate (or loose in the car) when you leave- hopefully this will seem obvious but nevertheless always an important reminder

What do you think? Do you crate your dog? What are the benefits and downsides? Let us know in the comments!

And if you are looking to crate here’s some of the more popular crates out there:

Midwest Life Stages Folding Metal Dog Crate

Petmate Vari Kennel

Precision Pet ProValu2 Dog Crate 

Remington Wire Kennel

Precision Pet Products Precision Pet ProValu Great Crate Double Door Dog Crate

And check out this guide to choosing the right size crate for your dog

Top 10 holiday tips for dogs

Nothing can ruin the holidays faster than a dog catastrophe (or should we say dog-astroph?) which is why we have scourged the web for you to find the best and most important tips to make sure you have the best holiday season ever!

  1. Tire out your dog before you get to your destination- they will probably get over excited, so the more you run around before the more likely they are to behave!
  2. Weather smarts- going someplace colder than usual and packing warm clothes for yourself? Don’t forget your dog can be cold too- stock up on warm garments for both of you (general rule of thumb- short hair breeds will be cold!)
  3. Maintain discipline and rules (even after your fourth glass of eggnog)- there will be many temptations lying around for your dog- from sweets to yummy holiday meals to presents to trample on. Use this time to reinforce positive behavior! And remember what’s delicious for us can be poisons to dogs so monitor what they eat and what treats your family members try and sneak them- keep chocolate and turkey bones out of reach!
  4. Decorations are a must, but can be challenging with your dog- decorative plants (such as poinsettia, mistletoe and holly) are toxic, tinsel can tear up your dog’s intestines, and cute holiday doggie outfits can be dangerous around the fireplace. Oh and we always keep our delicate tree decorations on the top, with the sturdier ones on the bottom.
  5. Don’t worry if your dog takes a nibble from your tree- they are not toxic and should not pose a threat (just keep clear on chemicals in the water)
  6. Trying to guess what’s in your wrapped presents- if it’s food chances are your dog will know before you and be more than happy to help you unwrap it. Keep those gifts out of your dogs reach. A pen is also a great solution here!
  7. Keep your gift wrapping supplies hidden away- they are tempting for pups and can be mistaken as toys
  8. If you are hosting and have lots of guests over make sure your dog has a safe space- guests can be overwhelming for dogs, and their overexcitement can be overwhelming for guests. Plan ahead by making sure they have their own corner where they feel safe. Also with the influx of people opening and closing your door make sure to keep their collars and identification on them.
  9. Dogs and kids don’t always mix- never leave young kids unattended with dogs.
  10. Keep candles on high shelves, and out of reach of wagging tails.

More tips and tricks!

Image credit: i.imgur.com