New Wearable Dog Technology? Why yes! Exclusive Launch event May 30-31st in NYC at Zoomies

Big News everyone! We are proud and happy to be hosting our NYC launch event on May 30-31 in NYC at the iconic and legendary Zoomies.

If you are in the area we would love to meet you, and if you are not then be sure to tell your friends and family!

We also have a brand new website, and would love it if you took a look!

Hachiko zoomies email campaign 2

10 Home remedies to perk up your pup

Colds, Flu’s, general winter blues got your pooch down? Before you run to the vet try these simple homemade remedies!

  1. Vitamin E- is great for your dogs skin. Apply directly to the skin by a doggie massage, or a soaking bath. If you want to give it orally talk to your vet about the proper dosage!
  2. Use citrus power to get rid of fleas- fleas hate citrus, so sprinkle your pet with a small amount of fresh squeezed orange or lemon juice
  3. Also sprinkle Borax powder on your floor when you dog has fleas and that will help by deteriorating the insects’ exoskeletons.
  4. Get rid of ticks and get a walking odor distributor- by dabbing some Rose geranium essential oil to your pooches collar
  5. Chamomile tea is great for itchy skin- make some tea let it cool and put it in a spray bottle and use as needed
  6. For a more serious itch make an oatmeal rub- mix oatmeal with water rub on to the itchy areas and leave for 10 minutes
  7. Upset tummy- give your dog some plain yogurt, the live cultures will ease it quickly
  8. For diarrhea- try mixing some pumpkin puree with your dogs food
  9. Alleviate bad breath with pupsciles- mix carrot, lime juice and fresh mint freeze and serve as a treat
  10. Does your pet get carsick? Grate ginger and mix with peanut butter as a snack before getting in the car

 

Have you used any kind of home remedies in the past? How long do you wait before turning to conventional medication?


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Haciko Debate: Raw food diet

We all know the age old saying of we are what we eat. One of the main decision us dog parents need to make is around what type of diet we want our pet to eat.

Dry food, wet food, raw food, commercial, locally made, homemade.

The choices can be overwhelming. And one of the hottest issues seems to be around raw diets. We wanted to take a deeper look at conversation and understand a little bit more what the advocate and critics say.

The raw food for dog movement started in Austalia in 1993 by vet Ian Billinghurst promoted “BARF” diet, which stands for Biologically Appropriate Raw Food, which was essentially Bones and Raw Food, and is according to Dr. Billinghurst a more natural diet in line with what dogs would eat in the wild. Critics have pointed out that 1. Dogs live much shorter lives in the wild, so this is not necessarily a strong selling point, and 2. That a lot of the breeds we raise at home are very different to wild dogs.

The FDA and ASPCA  have weighed in, backing the critics in saying that there are great health risks in raw food diets. Specially in a 2010 Pet food study the FDA testing 193 commercial raw food and found that 15 were positive for Salmonella and 32 were positive for L. monocytogenes.

However let’s look at the pro’s and con’s to the raw food diet:

Pro’s:

  • Safety– there have been numerous pet food recalls and by preparing your dog’s meals you know exactly what you are feeding them
  • Nutritional benfits– you control exactly what you dog eats (and can tailor food based on allergies or sensitives). Commercial dog food also contains preservatives which you can eliminate from your dog’s diet
  • Health benefits– Everything from better dental health, to shiner coats, and higher energy levels. Some even say this is an outlet for chewing tendencies and can lead to overall better behavior.

Con’s:

  • Safety concerns– raw food is known to contain a number of pathogens (such as Salmonella, Campylobacter, Escherichia coli O157:H7, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium botulinium, and Staphylococcus aureus). These pathogens usually only pose a serious human risk to the immuno-compromised, the elderly, and young children; however, this is a very important consideration if you are feeding a raw diet and have people in these risk groups living in your home.
  • Nutrition and health- Nutrient deficiency is a big concern on homemade raw diets. It’s hard to and time consuming to adequately balance a diet. Furthermore there are health risks from the food itself, eating bones has been known to hurt dogs and is a major concern.
  • Commitment– raw diets can be both very expensive and time consuming.

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