New Wearable Dog Technology? Why yes! Exclusive Launch event May 30-31st in NYC at Zoomies

Big News everyone! We are proud and happy to be hosting our NYC launch event on May 30-31 in NYC at the iconic and legendary Zoomies.

If you are in the area we would love to meet you, and if you are not then be sure to tell your friends and family!

We also have a brand new website, and would love it if you took a look!

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Moving With Your Dog

Moving . With your dog

Moving. That word can send a shiver up our spine like no other. Packing everything into boxes, hauling it across town (or even worse across country). It’s exhausting just thinking about it. But you also know the silver lining. The new house, new town- and in the end it’s worth it.

You dog, however, has no idea what’s going on.

So as you are planning your move and trying to make sure everything goes as smoothly as possible, don’t forget to make sure to take extra precautions to make the move as simple as possible for your pet.

  • Before the move – Build a checklist of things to take care of- be sure to include:
    • A visit to the vet- If you are moving far and you are leaving your vet go in for one last visit. Use this time to:
      • Get refills on all medications
      • Get any vaccines you need
      • If you are traveling long distance it may be worth getting a sedative
      • Ask for a copy of your dog’s medical history and vaccination records
      • Also always worth checking with them if they have a recommendation for a vet in your new area
    • Visit your groomer- here again if you are moving far then it’s worth a last to your favorite groomer. This is especially useful if you are going to travel by car because clipping those nails and a little trim can help keep your car looking spiffy.
    • Build a travel plan- You may just be moving a few streets down, but if you are moving farther away make sure to think out your travel plans
      • If you are flying to your new home double check the airline requirements- you may need a health certificate or an updated vaccine record
      • If you are driving to your new home be sure to plan the trip in advance:
        • Look at dog friendly hotels, restaurants and plan plenty of pit stops
      • Update your dog’s microchip- We The night before you leave update your dog’s microchip information with your new address
      • If you are moving close it’s worth to take your dog there ahead of time to start exploring the area
  • Packing:
    • Order your packing supplies (boxes, tape, etc.) and have them arrive a few days in advance so your pooch can get used to them
    • Involve them in the process. Let them sniff the boxes and poke about so they are not surprised when everything is packed away
    • Be reassuring and give a little more attention than usual (extra treats and snuggles)
    • But also try to maintain your normal routine- normal walks, feeding schedule and no special treatment like sleeping in your bed!
    • Pack your pooches belongings (bed, toys, etc.) last

More after the jump…

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Separation Anxiety- How to identify and treat it

 

When speaking with dog parents a common concern seems to come up- seperation anxiety. Separation anxiety can range from a mild problem, to a severe one, to a an extreme level more akin to separation panic. But don’t worry- there are ways to help alleviate this fear.

How to identify separation anxiety

A pup chewing your rug can also come from boredom, so how can you tell when you are looking at separation anxiety? According to most experts there are a few tell tale signs:

  • As you are getting ready to leave does your dog start to get depressed
  • When you walk out the door your dog will go into a slight panic- barking, scratching the door
  • Overly joyful when you get home (to the point of hysteria)
  • Read more about signs and symptoms here

At the end of the day you know your pet best, so trust your instincts here.

What to do

There are ways to alleviate separation anxiety.

  • No big goodbyes- try to avoid contact with your pet before you leave, the goodbyes are more for you, and if you make it a big deal they will see it that way
  • No big hello’s- same as goodbyes, when you get home ignore your dog for a few minutes, don’t immediately jump and pet them
  • Get them used to it- start by leaving for 5 minutes, then 20 and then a whole day
  • Leave a something of yours behind- a shirt you slept in, or anything that smells like you
  • Feed them right before you leave and they will associate you leaving with something positive
  • Take long walks before you leave- tired them and they can spend the time away from you contently napping
  • Some people prefer to crate their pooch to give them a sense of security

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