New Wearable Dog Technology? Why yes! Exclusive Launch event May 30-31st in NYC at Zoomies

Big News everyone! We are proud and happy to be hosting our NYC launch event on May 30-31 in NYC at the iconic and legendary Zoomies.

If you are in the area we would love to meet you, and if you are not then be sure to tell your friends and family!

We also have a brand new website, and would love it if you took a look!

Hachiko zoomies email campaign 2

Hachiko Debate: Diet VS Slentrol

We’ve all been know to pack on the pounds, and our pooches are no exception. In fact according to the Banfield state of pet health report from 2013 1 out of 4 pets in the US are obese.

Diet and Exercise:

When faced with a puggy pup your first response should be around diet and exercise. Unsurprisingly the number one cause of obesity is… overeating. You may measure your pet’s food scientifically, but treats, off the table nibbles will rack up the calories. Start here by reducing your pet’s food consumption by 25%, cutting out the treats, and give them raw veggies instead (broccoli, green beans and carrots seem to be a hit).

Also not all dog food is created equal so check out a list of alternatives or switch to a high fiber dog food. And in general when picking dog food look at the ingredients! Aim for food that is high in protein and low in fat and carbs.

Don’t underestimate the power of more exercise, take longer walks, incorporate sprints, walk up and down stairs and play multiple rounds of fetch.

 

Slentrol- the “magic pill”:

When all else fails there is the only FDA approved doggie diet pill. Slentrol suppresses appetite, and slows the transfer of dietary fat to the bloodstream, and according to reports it works. You pooch can lose up to 0.7% of their body weight in a week.

However this is not a long term fix. Since the pill lowers your dogs cholesterol it can have adverse effects such as depression, anxiety, aggression, vomiting and diarrhea.

Have you used slentrol? Tell us about your experiences!

To crate or not to crate?

There comes a point, sooner or later, when every dog parent is faced with a decision: to crate or not to crate.

While most experts agree that dogs should be crate trained, since some situations require it (for example after vet procedures or plane travel), there is a definite split between those that use crating at home for training/ containment purposes or for car travel.

Crating as a training/containment tool:

Many dog owners use crates with puppies and adopted adult dogs to train them and also to make sure dogs stay out of harm’s way when they are left alone.

  • Pro’s:
    • It can keep dogs safe- and prevent them from getting into trouble by chewing power cables, or running around the house
    • The carte can be a sanctuary for you dog- a safe place for them to go that is their own
    • It’s a great training tool
  • Con’s:
    • It is very easily abused- PETA is very firm in it’s guidance that crating as a training tool can have adverse effects
    • It deprives dogs of freedom- dogs that spend most of the day in a crate are limited in their movements, and limits their interaction with the environment
    • Can lead to behavioral problems when used excessively

Crating while travelling:

While in some situations, such as plane travel, this is not a decision left to us (then we need to decide if it’s worth the crating- but we’ll get into that later) we have come across an interesting debate in terms of crating during car travel.

  • Pro’s:
    • Less distracting for the driver- having your dog jumping or sliding around, or worse sitting on your lap (which is illegal in some states) can put both you’re and your pup in an emergency situation
    • Protects the dog in an emergency stop- there are also crash tested crates, so think of this as your dog’s seatbelt
  • Con’s
    • Owner guilt associated with putting their dog in a crate- we recommend taking frequent stops (every 2-3 hours) and let your dog out for a quick sniff and jog
    • Do not leave your dog in the crate (or loose in the car) when you leave- hopefully this will seem obvious but nevertheless always an important reminder

What do you think? Do you crate your dog? What are the benefits and downsides? Let us know in the comments!

And if you are looking to crate here’s some of the more popular crates out there:

Midwest Life Stages Folding Metal Dog Crate

Petmate Vari Kennel

Precision Pet ProValu2 Dog Crate 

Remington Wire Kennel

Precision Pet Products Precision Pet ProValu Great Crate Double Door Dog Crate

And check out this guide to choosing the right size crate for your dog

Top 10 holiday tips for dogs

Nothing can ruin the holidays faster than a dog catastrophe (or should we say dog-astroph?) which is why we have scourged the web for you to find the best and most important tips to make sure you have the best holiday season ever!

  1. Tire out your dog before you get to your destination- they will probably get over excited, so the more you run around before the more likely they are to behave!
  2. Weather smarts- going someplace colder than usual and packing warm clothes for yourself? Don’t forget your dog can be cold too- stock up on warm garments for both of you (general rule of thumb- short hair breeds will be cold!)
  3. Maintain discipline and rules (even after your fourth glass of eggnog)- there will be many temptations lying around for your dog- from sweets to yummy holiday meals to presents to trample on. Use this time to reinforce positive behavior! And remember what’s delicious for us can be poisons to dogs so monitor what they eat and what treats your family members try and sneak them- keep chocolate and turkey bones out of reach!
  4. Decorations are a must, but can be challenging with your dog- decorative plants (such as poinsettia, mistletoe and holly) are toxic, tinsel can tear up your dog’s intestines, and cute holiday doggie outfits can be dangerous around the fireplace. Oh and we always keep our delicate tree decorations on the top, with the sturdier ones on the bottom.
  5. Don’t worry if your dog takes a nibble from your tree- they are not toxic and should not pose a threat (just keep clear on chemicals in the water)
  6. Trying to guess what’s in your wrapped presents- if it’s food chances are your dog will know before you and be more than happy to help you unwrap it. Keep those gifts out of your dogs reach. A pen is also a great solution here!
  7. Keep your gift wrapping supplies hidden away- they are tempting for pups and can be mistaken as toys
  8. If you are hosting and have lots of guests over make sure your dog has a safe space- guests can be overwhelming for dogs, and their overexcitement can be overwhelming for guests. Plan ahead by making sure they have their own corner where they feel safe. Also with the influx of people opening and closing your door make sure to keep their collars and identification on them.
  9. Dogs and kids don’t always mix- never leave young kids unattended with dogs.
  10. Keep candles on high shelves, and out of reach of wagging tails.

More tips and tricks!

Image credit: i.imgur.com

Going Home for the Holidays: Taking your dog with you VS Leaving them behind

When we first heard about this debate it seemed like there was an obviously correct side- what kind of person would leave their poor pet alone for the holidays right?… But then again what kind of person would stuff their dog in a crate for a flight?

This is definitely a hot issue and each side has pro’s and con’s.

Taking your dog with you:                    

Pro’s:

  • They are part of the family and everyone should be together
  • Separation anxiety when they are not with you
  • You know they are going to be taken care of

Con’s:

  • Travel is not a great experience for dogs- especially if it involves planes/ long trips
  • Taking them to someone else’s house can be a burden
  • Being surrounded by lots of new people can cause anxiety and over excitement

Leaving your dog behind:

Pro’s:

  • Let’s be honest… more freedom
  • Easier travel and not burdening family members
  • Less planning and packing of dog supplies

Con’s:

  • Where to leave them is always an issue. With friends? With a dog sitter? Boarding? You need to have an option you trust
  • Can be a very expensive option

What do you think? How do you make these decisions?